• 28
    Aug

    Dr. Greg Story

    http://findyourelement.jp/dr-greg-story-biography/
    by

    Dr. Greg Story
    Dale Carnegie Training Japan President

    In the course of his career, Dr. Greg Story has moved from the academic world to consulting, investments, trade representation, international diplomacy, retail banking and people development. A Ph.D. in Japanese decision-making and a 30 year veteran of Japan, he has broad experience, having launched a “start up” in Nagoya, and completed “turn-arounds” in both Osaka and Tokyo for Austrade.  

    In 2001, he was promoted to Minister Commercial in the Australian Embassy and the Country Head for Austrade. In November 2003, Dr. Story joined Shinsei’s Retail Bank, which interestingly was a special combination of “start-up” and “turn-around.” He applied his long experience in change management to the task of revitalising the 7th largest bank in Japan. In November 2005, he began leading Shinsei’s Retail Branch national network. He had 550 staff in his Platinum Banking Division, responsible for two-thirds of the revenue of the Retail Bank, eventually becoming the Joint CEO of the Retail Bank. In July 2007, Dr. Story became the Country Head for the National Australia Bank in Japan. He expanded the scope of the business in Japan through attracting more customers, increasing sales, introducing new products and opening a branch in Osaka. 

    In October 2010, he joined Dale Carnegie Training Japan as President. From 2008-2010, Dr. Story was the Chairman of the Australia New Zealand Chamber of Commerce in Japan. He is a lecturer on both Presentation Skills and Business Planning for the Japan Market Expansion Competition (JMEC) and a Board Member of the Dale Carnegie International Franchisees Association.  An international keynote speaker, he is currently up to speech number 498, the majority of those delivered in Japanese. A 6th Dan in traditional Shitoryu Karate, he applies martial art philosophies and strategies to business issues.

    <Official Site>
    http://japan.dalecarnegie.com/

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